Nepal Fun Facts Travel Agents Should Share With Clients

Nepal is a country of nuances – just when you think you know it all, it surprises you. From the underrated wildlife to the incredible concentration of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Kathmandu, it’s a country that can’t be conventionally categorized because there truly is something for every type of traveler. Below, a round-up of interesting facts to share with your clients:

Unique Wildlife

Most travelers are surprised to find that there are rhinos in Nepal – however, that’s not the only unsuspecting animal. Nepal is also home to foxes, tigers, leopards (clouded and snow), elephants, pangolins, red pandas, and even dolphins! The country’s unique topography provides for incredible biodiversity in varied micro-climates.

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

There are 10 UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the small country: Chitwan and Sagarmatha National Park, Lumbini (the birthplace of Buddha), and seven in the Kathmandu Valley including Kathmandu Durbar Square, Bhaktapur Durbar Square, Patan Durbar Square, Swayambhunath, Pashupatinath, and Changunarayan.

Culture

Unlike in most countries, blood has never been spilled in the name of religion. Over 80 ethnic groups speaking 123 different languages all live harmoniously. Part of what makes Nepal so unique is the conflation of these different cultures that contribute to the country’s identity.

Tall Peaks

Nepal has the highest mountains in the world – in fact, 8 of the tallest world peaks are located here, the most impressive being the famed Mount Everest which sits at 8,848 meters above sea level.

More Fun Facts:

  • It is the year 2074 in Nepal. Instead of the Gregorian calendar, Nepal uses the Nepalese calendar or Bikram Sambat which includes elements of the lunar calendar and solar calendar.
  • The national sport is volleyball.
  • Nepal is the largest producer of mustard seeds and the third largest producer of ginger.

Share:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestGoogle+Share on LinkedIn

A Celebration of Nepali Culture: Tihar Festival

photo via Himalayan Times

Nepal is full of rich cultural history that manifests into celebrations that we cherish with family and friends. One of the largest festivals celebrated in Nepal is Tihar (also known as Deepawali, or the festival of lights). The five-day Hindu celebration in November is held to give thanks to the contributions of the gods, people and animals; it’s slotted time for us to be reminded of the community that adds richness in our lives. During Tihar, the towns are illuminated with lit diyas and homes are decorated with patterns of colored rice and flower petals as a sacred welcoming – this makes it one of the most beautiful times for travelers to visit and join in the celebrations with us. Continue reading

Share:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestGoogle+Share on LinkedIn

Nepal’s High Season Has Activities for All Types of Travelers

It’s no secret that Nepal is a country famous for its mountain range, the Himalayas. After all, 8 of the world’s tallest peaks lies in Nepal, paving a way for world-class hiking and picturesque treks from the Annapurna Circuit to the Everest Base Camp trek. The country is regarded as the top destination for adventure travelers but Nepal is more than the identity guidebooks give us. It is an ancient country and within the mountain ranges are ornate cities chock-full of tradition, historic temples, spiritual sites and unrivaled natural landscapes full of beauty. Continue reading

Share:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestGoogle+Share on LinkedIn

Voluntarism in Nepal from Melbourne University with Royal Mountain Travel


Since 12 years of the establishment of the Royal Mountain Travel, and in these twelve years we’ve been firmly committed to the sustainable and responsible tourism. We have always believed in the development of the society, community, and the country should come first before the development of our company. Especially in the travel industry; adding the valuable experience in the vacation of the travellers’ and settling them in the safest destination is the harvesting process and this will continue for a longer period of time. Continue reading

Share:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestGoogle+Share on LinkedIn

Let there be light: Emerging from the ages of power cuts


Not believing my ears in November 2016 when I heard a friend comment “Bhatti nai jadaina’ I was delighted to hear that for the first time in over a decade, there was to be no ‘loadshedding’ in Kathmandu. Loadshedding or power cut has been a feature of life in Kathmandu and most of the country for over a decade. Indeed, many villages supplied by micro-hydro electricity power have had more light than the capital city. Continue reading

Share:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestGoogle+Share on LinkedIn