Off-the-beaten-path experiences in Nepal

For years, Kathmandu, Everest, and Annapurna have enticed travelers with dreams of exotic cultural experiences and epic trekking routes. While Nepal’s main attractions might be exactly what your clients are looking for, some of our favorite travel moments here have come from stepping off the beaten path. And Nepal offers a multitude of ways for travelers to do just that while making a deep connection with locals and discovering some of our country’s beautiful landscapes. 

Here are just a few of our favorites places:

Chepang Hills

These hills lie in the shadows of the Annapurna Range and offer some of the least-trafficked trails and magnificent views. Home to the Chepang people, this area is dotted with villages and terraced fields. Stay with a local family in Upardang Gadi, a historic village, and climb up the massive fort from the Shah dynasty era for vistas of both the Annapurna and Manaslu ranges, a well as Chitwan Valley. A homestay gives travelers the opportunity to learn about the hunter-gatherer culture of this small ethnic group, who often share traditional songs and dances with visitors. Read more about traveling the region here

Panauti

One of the oldest towns in Nepal, Panauti offers a chance for travelers to step back in time to see a preserved medieval town, as well as the more modern one that has grown up around it. A tentative UNESCO World Heritage Site, Panauti is known for its many temples and stupas, and for its cultural and religious festivals. Travelers who want to immerse themselves in the culture will want to stay in the community homestay, run by a group of local women. As hosts, these women offer cultural programs, cooking classes and community hikes into the surrounding countryside. We often recommend combining a trek through Chepang Hills, a visit to Chitwan National Park and a stay in Panauti on this itinerary.

Panauti

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Reasons to Visit Nepal in the Low Season

Sometimes there isn’t a clear answer to the most commonly asked questions, like “When is the best time to go?”

Nepal’s monsoon and winter seasons (i.e. the low tourism seasons) fall between June and August and December and February respectively. Both are premium travel times for those on summer breaks or Christmas/New Year’s vacations. And both offer surprisingly valid reasons for booking a vacation to Nepal during these months, nevermind that travel costs are cheaper. 

As “overtourism” becomes a more commonly used word, travelers are seeking more sustainable ways to visit popular destinations and taking vacations during the off-season is one way to do that. Timing travel to when the crowds have dissipated means there’s less impact on the destination. 

Here are a few places we love to visit during Nepal’s low seasons:

  • The Terai region, the southernmost part of the country, is a wet lowland area and it is home to Chitwan National Park, Nepal’s first national park. Chitwan’s jungle is a sanctuary for one-horned rhinoceros, Bengal tigers, crocodiles and rare birds. Wildlife safaris in the park can be far more enjoyable, and less steamy, in the winter. Our “Magical Nepal” itinerary combines three days in Chitwan with cultural attractions in Pokhara and Kathmandu and more.

Photo by Pradeep Chamaria

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Holi: The Most Fun Day of the Year

Nepal’s celebration of Holi is a colorful festival that is open to all, locals and visitors alike. The revered Hindu holiday, which dates back to the fourth century and signifies the arrival of spring, has gained attention in the U.S. in recent years and a number of travelers feel called to participate in the joyful revelry. A care-free celebration with people of all ages smearing each other with colored powders and drenching each other with water in the streets seems like the perfect excuse for a vacation, right?

Photo source: Inside Himalayas

While Holi truly begins with the installation of a ceremonial pole in Kathmandu Durbar Square almost a week earlier and religious ritual and prayer around a bonfire the night before, the free-for-all of color is found all around the square, the city streets, temples, parks and into the hill region on the day immediately following the full moon in March. The second day of festivities continues in the Terai with celebrations and feasts in area homes. Continue reading

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Sustainability, and the living is easy: Our commitments

At Royal Mountain Travel, we don’t just practice sustainable tourism, but sustainable living. As one of our core values, sustainability is woven through every element of our business and we’re proud of the work we’ve done to put our environment and our people first. 

As a Travelife Certified company, we know every small step we take to protect our environment has a powerful ripple effect. Eliminating single-use plastics is one of the most important steps we can take and we’re committed to it. Earlier this year, we gave each of our team members reusable water bottles, 500 in all. Each reusable bottle replaces roughly 217 plastic ones in a year, which means roughly 108,500 plastic bottles will be saved from landfills this year. We know this step starts with us, but will inspire similar actions among our guests and colleagues because we didn’t stop there.  Continue reading

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Two Happy Generations Working with Royal Mountain Travel

“We are happy here” was the first thing they both said when asked why Royal Mountain Travel?  Chandraman Tamang and Choisyang Tamang, the father son duo from Bhinkhure, Kavrepalanchowk district have been working with Royal Mountain travel since its establishment in 2005. The smiles on their faces were just enough to prove that they were happy.

In order to know the reason behind those happy faces we had a conversation for about an hour. The story of happiness was well worth listening to. Continue reading

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How to Spot Red Pandas and Dolphins in Nepal

Plataniste or Ganges river dolphin (Platanista gangética), Karnaphuli river, Bangladesh Plataniste or Ganges river dolphin (Platanista gangética), Karnaphuli river, BangladeshDo you know what makes Nepal one of the most biodiverse countries in the world? Hint: it has something to do with a giant called the Himalayas. The climate range is so broad – from the highest point in the world (Everest) to the tropical lowlands that are engulfed in humidity and home to rainforests – the tremendous geographic diversity plays a part in the range of flora and fauna that exist within the country. Continue reading

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Sustainable Tourism Can Help Wildlife Conservation Efforts


You don’t have to travel deep into Chitwan National Park in the Terai Lowlands of Nepal to come face-to-face with the once elusive one-horned rhino. Thanks to major conservation efforts, the population has grown from a mere 40 to over 600 living in the park today, making it an easier feat to spot one of these incredible creatures. In fact, you’re almost guaranteed to see one on safari – a major contributor to that possibility? Tourism. Continue reading

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The Future is Female: How Empowering Women Can Uplift Communities

Tourism is a powerful, and often, underused tool. It has the potential to ignite change and uplift communities that have traditionally lacked the resources to operate sustainably. Perhaps one of its most important benefits is its ability to improve the livelihoods of women – to bring gender equality into areas that have historically undervalued the positive impact women can make in the family, community and country.

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Great alliance in the Tourism Industry for the better Future.

“Susta­­­­­­inable travel is up to all of us – travelers and industry providers alike – to integrate into every journey.” said Hostelling International USA’s Director of Communications and PR Netanya Trimboli in New York on Nov 17 at the ‘Global Summit’ for the sustainable tourism. I had the honour and privilege to participate in Travel+SocialGood’s Global Summit in New York. On the same event, Travel+SocialGood rebranded its name to ‘Impact Travel Alliance (ITA)’. Continue reading

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